Posts Tagged 'reading'

2012 In Books

Well, I’m about 3 months late, but rest assured, I still keep tabs on what I read. I’ve had my ups and downs last year, voraciously reading on my iPad for months on end, then falling into TV series for weeks before returning to books once again. In 2011, I read 85 books. I didn’t manage to read 100 in 2012, but I’ll try once again this year. Although, I’m onto a slow start. However, things are picking up again, and I hope to have at least 20-40 books read by midyear.

Continue reading ‘2012 In Books’

Moyee Monster Chair: Get Gobbled up in Comfort

I don’t know why, but getting gobbled up by this plush monster looks more comfy than scary. This chair was created by Jason Goh and was inspired by a story his grandmother used to tell him about how fish balls would turn into a giant hairy hungry monster if he didn’t eat them up. Needless to say, that if I was a kid and heard that, I’d probably gobble up my fish balls as well. Mmmm. Fish balls.

fish ball monster moyee chair

Read more @ Technabob

Brain’s Reading Centers Are Culturally Universal No Matter What Language

mandarin-flash-cards

The brain scans of French and Mandarin native speakers have shown that people use the same areas in the brain for reading, no matter what language they are reading.

Read more @ SciTechDaily

Growth in Brain’s White Matter Tracts Could Predict Literacy

myelination

Section through nerve fibers within the sciatic nerve as seen under the electron microscope: the axons (nerve cell projections, pink) are only poorly surrounded by a myelin sheath (generated by Schwann cells, coloured blue) following inactivation of the gene encoding BACE1, which controls the myelination process (right panel). The nerve fibres in a control animal (left panel, BACE1 gene is intact) are in contrast surrounded by thick myelin sheaths (dark rings). (Picture: Dr. Alistair Garratt/Copyright: MDC).

Brain connectivity can predict reading skills, thanks to brain scans and the examination of the growth of long-range connections in the brain. These allow researchers to predict how a child’s reading skills will develop.

Read more @ SciTechDaily

Information Flow & Digest

20120529-132521.jpg

Since I got an iPhone last March (my first smartphone), the way that I access and consume information has changed. While I’ve had an iPad for about 5 months, I hadn’t yet gotten a 3G card from my carrier. There is a big difference between having access to the Internet anywhere and just not being able to do so. The places I go to don’t have reliable free WiFi. The iPhone 4S allows me to tether my iPad for free, because my carrier is CHT in Taiwan and they are partly government-owned, my iPad 2 still hasn’t gotten an 3G card.

Continue reading ‘Information Flow & Digest’

2011 in Books

1Q84 by Haruki Murakami

Here is the complete list of books that I read in 2011. There are some months that I didn’t read much, and in late December, I got an iPad since I started reading a lot more ebooks. The iPad makes reading books so much more convenient. Once you finish one, you can immediately start another. I’ve probably read a lot more because of the iPad and the 2,881 books that I have on it. I had been reading books on my MacBook Pro for the last couple of months, and I found it tiresome, especially when you read at night before going to bed. This isn’t the case with the iPad. I’ve read a lot of books on it in the month of December, almost all of them, and it was a pleasant experience.

Compared to last year, I read 41 more books. I read a total of 85 books last year. This year, I hope to reach 100. Standout books for this year were 1Q84, The Prague Cemetery, 2666, The Savage Detectives, Reamde, and the Jasper Fforde books. At the rate I read, and because of the prevalence of ebooks, I tend to read through an author’s repertoire quickly, unless they’re prolific.

Towards the end of the year, after reading a lot of fiction, I started to read some science-fiction again. I finally finished all of the Ender’s Game and Ender’s Shadow novels by Orson Scott Card. A friend also suggested Richard Morgan. I devoured his books, though the last one, Woken Furies, wasn’t as good as the previous two.

This is the year that I started reading many books at the same time. Once I felt that a book was challenging, I usually started reading something else, to make it easier. At the worst, I was reading 7 books at the same time. Now, I’m back to more manageable number, with still a few books to finish. I also live by a rule: any book that I start must be finished, even if it is boring. I keep my list updated with the books I read over the months. I might have to switch to a monthly digest as I have done before to make the list easier to peruse.

Continue reading ‘2011 in Books’

Currently Reading – Late November 2011

Adam Levin's 1000-page monster, The Instructions

There are a lot of good books that have come out since mid-October. The flood hasn’t stopped and I am currently reading 8 books at the same time, which is unusual. I usually like to read one book at a time, maybe too. This is probably down to the fact that The Instructions is such a time-consuming read. Unlike 1Q84, which is of similar length, and Reamde, the words seem to flow less in The Instructions, making it a harder read.

Continue reading ‘Currently Reading – Late November 2011′


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ranjitwithkinginbehand.jpgI'm Range, your host. On the menu, photos, art, stories, entertainment and reviews. Links, maths, education and social issues. I'm in Quebec (Canada) or Taiwan (R.O.C.). Follow me on Twitter.

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