SN Primo Is Farthest Type Ia Supernova Discovered

tycho-remnant-supernova

Supernova Primo originated 9 billion years ago, when its progenitor star exploded. The light was captured by the Hubble Space Telescope by a three-year project specifically trying to find Type Ia supernovae. These types of supernovae are paramount in order to discover more about the inflationary nature of our universe.

Read more @ SciTechDaily

Author: range

I'm mathematician/IT strategist/blogger from Canada living in Taipei.

2 thoughts on “SN Primo Is Farthest Type Ia Supernova Discovered”

  1. It takes a 1 solar mass star (like our sun) about 10 billion years to reach the white dwarf stage – limited to the Chandrasekhar Limit of 1.4 solar masses. The white dwarf can exist at this stage for billions of additional years. If SN “Primo” was a 1 solar mass white dwarf that happened to blow up as soon as it reached this state and it has taken the light from this event 9 billion years to reach our photon detectors – that’s at least 19 billion years – pretty good for a 13.7 billion year old universe!
    Mike Baker
    Warrensburg, MO

  2. More on White Dwarfs as Type 1A SN’s – While a 1.0 solar mass star of average composition takes about 10 billion years to reach the white dwarf stage (this type mass accounts for about 80% of all white dwarfs); a 1.25 mass star takes 4.6 billion years to reach this stage, a 1.5 mass star reaches this stage in only 2.3 billion years and a 2.25 solar mass star in 585 million years! So my comment is without merit I think because it obvious that with a little more mass, in a binary system, events like “SN Primo” can take place within current time lines for age of the universe estimates. Note: White Dwarfs can be formed from stars that had a mass greater than the Chandrasekhar limit during their main sequence phase, but must be below it prior to the white dwarf stage (and this is probably accomplished by ejecting mass during the Red Giant phase). Good reference: Stars and Clusters by Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin, Harvard University Press, 1979. Thanks to Adam Reiss for giving me the hint.

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