Neolithic Pottery Reveals Cheese-Making from 7,500 Years Ago

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A team of scientists from Princeton University and the University of Bristol, UK, have discovered traces of dairy fat in ancient ceramic fragments, indicating that humans have been making cheese in Europe for up to 7,500 years. Early dairy farmers probably devised cheese-making as a way to preserve milk.

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Ancient Cooking Stones Help Reconstruct Earth’s Magnetic History

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Cooking stones that line Maori steam ovens in New Zealand are helping scientists study the history of the Earth’s magnetic field. The cooking process generates so much heat that the magnetic minerals in the stones will realign themselves with the direction of the current field.

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Stone Blades Suggest that Early Humans Passed on Technological Skills

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Archaeologists have discovered some new stone blades from a cave from South Africa that seem to indicate that early humans were already quite adapt at crafting blades.

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Extinct Animals from the Pleistocene Discovered in Mexico

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More than a hundred bones of animals, some which could be of human origin from the final stages of the Pleistocene period, were found in the Atontonilco de Tula, Hidalgo scattered within an area of 100 acres, between 7 and 10 meters in depth.

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Ancient Murals in Guatemala Offer Glimpse of Mayan Astronomy

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Archaeologists have discovered the earliest evidence of the sophisticated astronomy and the time-keeping rituals of the ancient Mayan people, deep under the earth in the Guatemalan rain forest. The researchers led by David Stuart, anthropologist at the University of Texas in Austin, published their findings in the journal Science.

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Exposing 8,000 Years of Civilization with Satellites

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Analysis of the locations of ancient settlements can reveal the many connections between them.

Hidden beneath mounds of Earth, in the fertile crescent of the Middle East, lie overlooked networks of small settlements that date back millennia. Archaeologists are now probing these mounds to find out more about early human settlements.

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Tree Rings Reveal What Led To Angkor Wat’s Downfall

Thousand year old trees are revealing what exactly happened to Angkor Wat in Cambodia, and what let to its downfall.