Epistolary

epistolary (comparative more epistolary, superlative most epistolary)

Positive
epistolary
Comparative
more epistolary
Superlative
most epistolary
  1. of, or related to letters, or the writing of letters
  2. carried on by written correspondence

An epistolary novel is a novel written as a series of documents. The usual form is letters, although diary entries, newspaper clippings and other documents are sometimes used. Recently, electronic “documents” such as recordings and radio, blogs, and e-mails have also come into use. The word epistolary comes from the Latin word epistola, meaning a letter.

{via wikitionary}

Gift-Lift

to gift-lift (compound verb)

This describes the action of stealing something and then giving it as a gift to someone else. The action of stealing is the “lifting” part of the verb.

Notes: Gift-lifting reminds me a lot of the commonly used term regifting, when received gifts are given to other people, usually in the guise of it being a new gift, because they aren’t liked or needed initially. There can be charitable motives to regifting, but it usually saves buying a useless gift for someone that isn’t that close to you. It’s akin to recycling or re-purposing gifts.

Ex: Neil gift-lifted this Hermès scarf from Nordstrom’s to his girlfriend Joan.

Light-Switch Romance

Light-switch romance (compound noun, singular)

An intense on- and off-again romantic relationship between two people. It’s an analogy to the on/off button of a light-switch interrupter. There’s no in-between. It’s either full on or full off.

Notes: Naturally, this doesn’t take into consideration the use of a dimmer for the light-switch. I just had to say that because I found that funny.

Ex: Regina’s light-switch romance with her biker boyfriend recently got out of hand.