Francis Urquhart & House of Cards

via Wikipedia

You might think that, but I’m afraid that I couldn’t possibly comment.
Francis Urquhart

When I was younger, I enjoyed two famous dramas on PBS from the UK. They were mini-series and both had Ian Richardson. The first was Porterhouse Blue and the second was the House of Cards trilogy.

In House of Cards, Ian Richardson portrayed the Machiavellian Francis Urquhart and his quest to for power. It slipped my mind that Richardson actually died in 2007. Anyway, I just spent some time yesterday watching House of Cards again. Needless to say that it’s pretty good. I’m unsure if I have seen all three mini-series, but I’ve just started watching To Play King.

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Generation Kill The Cradle Of Civilization S01E02 (HBO)

Generation Kill is an American war mini-series on the US cable channel HBO that explores the lives of the men in a U.S. Marine Corps battalion as they serve their country during the early days of the second War in Iraq.

The mini-series comes from the creative team behind HBO’s critically acclaimed The Wire. It is based on Evan Wright’s book of the same name, which finds its origins in a series of essays published in Rolling Stone Magazine. The essays were written during his stint as an embedded member of the Marines’ First Reconnaissance Battalion. It was adapted by David Simon and Ed Burns.

Wright’s portrayal of the soldiers in Generation Kill is the first glimpse of a fighting force raised on a palpable culture of violence (slickly produced war movies, gangster rap and rock in particular), who are street-savvy beyond any generation of soldiers prior, and how they deal with the disjunction between Hollywood war and actual war, their biographical influences and bureaucracy.
Vaughn From Filthy Skies

Just like some of the other wars in the last century were socially and psychologically dissected, Generation Kill does the same for the Gulf Wars. It is much needed since these types of incisive examinations in popular culture are rare for the moment, as there is no palpable end in sight for the war on terror and that soldiers are living through these moments as we speak. This makes the Second Gulf War a controversial subject to say the least.

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Generation Kill Get Some S01E01 (HBO)

Generation Kill is an American war mini-series on the US cable channel HBO that explores the lives of the men in a U.S. Marine Corps battalion as they serve their country during the early days of the second War in Iraq.

The mini-series comes from the creative team behind HBO’s critically acclaimed The Wire. It is based on Evan Wright’s book of the same name, which finds its origins in a series of essays published in Rolling Stone Magazine. The essays were written during his stint as an embedded member of the Marines’ First Reconnaissance Battalion. It was adapted by David Simon and Ed Burns.

Wright’s portrayal of the soldiers in Generation Kill is the first glimpse of a fighting force raised on a palpable culture of violence (slickly produced war movies, gangster rap and rock in particular), who are street-savvy beyond any generation of soldiers prior, and how they deal with the disjunction between Hollywood war and actual war, their biographical influences and bureaucracy.
Vaughn From Filthy Skies

Continue reading “Generation Kill Get Some S01E01 (HBO)”

The Last Enemy S01E05 (BBC)

The Last Enemy is a BBC TV series starring Benedict Cumberbatch and featuring Robert Carlyle and Max Beesley which first aired on 17 February 2008.

Set in a near-future United Kingdom beset by terrorism and illegal immigration, it features the introduction of “TIA”, a centralised database that can be used to track and monitor anybody effectively by putting all available government information in one place. The story deals with a political cover-up centred around the emergence of a deadly virus, as well as the moral, social and privacy concerns (and even merits) of such a system in a post-9/11 world. The story is told through the eyes of a mathematical genius who is portrayed as a recluse and showing some signs of OCD.

I’ve always been a fan of espionage, ever since I read the Robert Ludlum novels at a tender young age of 10. This is one of the reasons why I’ve stopped reading them, since they simply followed a tried and tested formula. It got repetitive after 10 novels or so. I got really interested in Tom Clancy novels after that.

Continue reading “The Last Enemy S01E05 (BBC)”

The Last Enemy S01E04 (BBC)

The Last Enemy is a BBC TV series starring Benedict Cumberbatch and featuring Robert Carlyle and Max Beesley which first aired on 17 February 2008.

Set in a near-future United Kingdom beset by terrorism and illegal immigration, it features the introduction of “TIA”, a centralised database that can be used to track and monitor anybody effectively by putting all available government information in one place. The story deals with a political cover-up centred around the emergence of a deadly virus, as well as the moral, social and privacy concerns (and even merits) of such a system in a post-9/11 world. The story is told through the eyes of a mathematical genius who is portrayed as a recluse and showing some signs of OCD.

I’ve always been a fan of espionage, ever since I read the Robert Ludlum novels at a tender young age of 10. This is one of the reasons why I’ve stopped reading them, since they simply followed a tried and tested formula. It got repetitive after 10 novels or so. I got really interested in Tom Clancy novels after that.

Continue reading “The Last Enemy S01E04 (BBC)”

The Last Enemy S01E03 (BBC)

The Last Enemy is a BBC TV series starring Benedict Cumberbatch and featuring Robert Carlyle and Max Beesley which first aired on 17 February 2008.

Set in a near-future United Kingdom beset by terrorism and illegal immigration, it features the introduction of “TIA”, a centralised database that can be used to track and monitor anybody effectively by putting all available government information in one place. The story deals with a political cover-up centred around the emergence of a deadly virus, as well as the moral, social and privacy concerns (and even merits) of such a system in a post-9/11 world. The story is told through the eyes of a mathematical genius who is portrayed as a recluse and showing some signs of OCD.

I’ve always been a fan of espionage, ever since I read the Robert Ludlum novels at a tender young age of 10. This is one of the reasons why I’ve stopped reading them, since they simply followed a tried and tested formula. It got repetitive after 10 novels or so. I got really interested in Tom Clancy novels after that.

The Last Enemy is really interesting. In the future, the UK has become a Big Brother like society. It’s not really as extreme as that epithet leads you to believe. It’s the beginning of the end of free will to protect the society from imagined or real terrorism. It draws a disturbing parallel with what is happening in the US right now. That’s not to say that this isn’t happening in Europe as well.

Continue reading “The Last Enemy S01E03 (BBC)”

The Last Enemy S01E02 (BBC)

The Last Enemy is a BBC TV series starring Benedict Cumberbatch and featuring Robert Carlyle and Max Beesley which first aired on 17 February 2008.

Set in a near-future United Kingdom beset by terrorism and illegal immigration, it features the introduction of “TIA”, a centralised database that can be used to track and monitor anybody effectively by putting all available government information in one place. The story deals with a political cover-up centred around the emergence of a deadly virus, as well as the moral, social and privacy concerns (and even merits) of such a system in a post-9/11 world. The story is told through the eyes of a mathematical genius who is portrayed as a recluse and showing some signs of OCD.

Continue reading “The Last Enemy S01E02 (BBC)”