Ex-Sex

I came across this word in this week’s Chicago Code. It was an interesting word, especially phonetically. When repeated quickly, both words get mixed up.

ex-sex (n) having sex with one of your exes.

Does your fiancée know about the ex-sex?

 

 

On Asshats, Asstards & Assclown

Asshat is a slightly trendier and less severe variation of asshole, graphically describing someone who has his “head up his own ass” (i.e., not knowing what’s going on): one is wearing one’s ass for a hat. A more modern usage of asshat describes a person doing something stupid, and can apply to anyone: “The boss is up to asshattery because he broke the computer even though he knew he was doing the wrong thing.” This meaning was popularized by Something Awful character Jeff K. The word is popular in many online communities, serving as a more palatable version of its antecedent. According to Google’s Usenet statistics, the word only saw a token appearance every day or two starting in July 1999, but following a slow rise in 2002, it entered popular usage in May 2003. As it continued to grow in popularity, asshat began to be used by online gamers, in first person shooter and massively multiplayer role playing games. It was a commonplace word on servers where vulgar language was not allowed.

The insult assclown is used in a similar fashion, although it is not as common. Assclown has become well known among fans of World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) due to wrestler Chris Jericho using it during his promos, especially his “Highlight Reel”. The term was also used in the film Office Space to describe singer-songwriter Michael Bolton. “Assclown” is also used by radio personality Todd Schnitt.

Asstard is another rarer variant upon the ass- theme. It is possibly a portmanteau of asshole and retard and has almost the same meaning as asshole, but with a greater implied connotation of stupidity. An identically spelled version of the same word is a contraction of asshole and bastard, with a commensurately more abusive meaning.

Asspit is a descriptive noun following this construction, used to describe places that are run-down or dirty, as in: “This house is an asspit.” It has a generally pejorative connotation.

Blackball & to Blackball & Blackballing

Pronunciation

  • enPR: blăk’bôl’
  • IPA: /blæk’bɔːl/

Noun

Singular
blackball
Plural
blackballs

blackball (plural blackballs)

  1. a rejection, a vote against admitting someone
  2. a black ball used to indicate such a negative vote
    Regardless how many other people may have voted to approve a candidate for membership,a single blackball will reject the candidate.
  3. the act of so rejecting someone

Verb

Infinitive
to blackball
Third person singular
blackballs
Simple past
blackballed
Past participle
blackballed
Present participle
blackballing

to blackball (third-person singular simple present blackballs, present participle blackballing, simple past and past participle blackballed)

  1. (transitive) to vote against, especially in an exclusive organization
    If you’re not from a moneyed, well-connected family, you can count on getting blackballed from the fraternity.
  2. (transitive) to ostracize

{via wiki}

Gift-Lift

to gift-lift (compound verb)

This describes the action of stealing something and then giving it as a gift to someone else. The action of stealing is the “lifting” part of the verb.

Notes: Gift-lifting reminds me a lot of the commonly used term regifting, when received gifts are given to other people, usually in the guise of it being a new gift, because they aren’t liked or needed initially. There can be charitable motives to regifting, but it usually saves buying a useless gift for someone that isn’t that close to you. It’s akin to recycling or re-purposing gifts.

Ex: Neil gift-lifted this Hermès scarf from Nordstrom’s to his girlfriend Joan.

Light-Switch Romance

Light-switch romance (compound noun, singular)

An intense on- and off-again romantic relationship between two people. It’s an analogy to the on/off button of a light-switch interrupter. There’s no in-between. It’s either full on or full off.

Notes: Naturally, this doesn’t take into consideration the use of a dimmer for the light-switch. I just had to say that because I found that funny.

Ex: Regina’s light-switch romance with her biker boyfriend recently got out of hand.

Death Panels and Trollumnists

After getting the term trollumnist out there, I came upon this article over at 3QD which clearly points out a few examples of trollumnists. Unlike the original article which coined the term trollunist, these aren’t Australian examples, but really good American ones.

The first example of a trollumnist is is none other than Betsy McCaughey, who’s infamous for coining death panels and being the architect behind the idea.

Betsy McCaughey – architect of the widely rumored “death panels” idea – that Obama’s health care proposals would create government sponsored draconian consultations imposing conditions upon both patients in end-of-life circumstances and doctors treating said patients to decide which patients were worthy of living.

Here is where the trolluminsm comes in:

James Fallows of the Atlantic Monthly described her role in the healthcare debate as: “She has brought more misinformation, more often, more destructively into America’s consideration of health-policy issues than any other individual. She has no concept of “truth” or “accuracy” in the normal senses of those terms, as demonstrated when she went on The Daily Show¹. Betsy resigned from the board of directors of Cantel Medical Corporation the next day.

Bill Kristol is another fine example of a trollumnist.

But Jon manages to rise past the agendas of his guests – conservatives and liberals alike – in the most ingratiating manner. When he peppered Bill Kristol – editor of Weekly Standard, a right-wing opponent of health care reform that includes a public insurance option – he even managed to steer him into complimenting government run health-care².

Trollumnist

I’ve never come across the term trollumnist, but it’s pretty self-evident that there are quite a few trollumnists out there. So what is a trollumnist?

{Note, the word has been added to the Urban Dictionary}

Trollumnist (n.) — A writer or blogger who “trolls” in a multichannel, multimedia environment, trying to bait readers into a reaction that editors want to generate. Comes from the term trolling or the noun trolls.

Here is what trolling is all about:

In Internet slang, a troll is someone who posts controversial, inflammatory, irrelevant, or off-topic messages in an online community, such as an online discussion forum, chat room or blog, with the primary intent of provoking other users into an emotional response or of otherwise disrupting normal on-topic discussion.

Here is where the term first came to my attention:

As the newspaper business model heads south, though, we’ve been subjected to the rise of what we might christen the “trollumnist” — the writer who simply “trolls” in a multichannel, multimedia environment. And the erstwhile self-identification of papers like the Sydney Morning Herald and The Australian as quality outlets matters little in the attention economy: on the internet, no one knows you’re a broadsheet. Whereas a true columnist might make controversial arguments or challenge common sense, trollumnists merely provoke outrage in order to sell papers, draw links and capture increasingly scarce reader attention. The beauty of it all is that it doesn’t take much training to do it, and as media content goes, it’s cheap as chips. Any fool can offend people given a reasonably prominent platform.

{via david reid}

Hothouse

Verb

Infinitive
to hothouse
3rd pers sing
hothouses
Simple past
hothoused
Past participle
hothoused
Pres part
hothousing

to hothouse (third-person singular simple present hothouses, present participle hothousing, simple past and past participle hothoused)

  1. (of a child) to provide with an enriched environment with the aim of stimulating academic development

This version of hothouse had never really come up for me before, but it did recently. It’s a great use of this interesting word.

Oblication

Oblication | “A vacation combined with an obligation, such as a work engagement or visiting family.”

*

Oblication is a portmanteau of obligation and vacation. I really like it!

Book Squadrons

I started reading Schott’s Vocab about a week ago and I have to say that it really cracks me up. Book squadrons refer to state-sponsored book clubs set up by Hugo Chavez’s administration.

Roving book squadrons?

I really liked this bit:

Beyond the book give-aways, another key part of the Reading Plan are thousands of “book squadrons.”

These are basically roving book clubs that are intended to encourage reading on the metro, in public squares and in parks.

Each squadron wears a different colour to identify their type of book. For example, the red team promotes autobiographies while the black team discusses books on “militant resistance.”

The government say they will spread the word of the benefits of reading to the rest of the community. The opposition say they are the thought police.

(via schott’s vocab)