Operation Mincemeat in WWII

Extraordinary piece about Operation Mincemeat, Ben Macintyre’s new book, in the New Yorker about a secret briefcase, Nazis, and Allies.

The letter was a fake, and the frantic messages between London and Madrid a carefully choreographed act. When a hundred and sixty thousand Allied troops invaded Sicily on July 10, 1943, it became clear that the Germans had fallen victim to one of the most remarkable deceptions in modern military history.

In 1941, British authorities had to bail him out of a Spanish jail, dressed in “high heels, lipstick, pearls, and a chic cloche hat, his hands, in long opera gloves, demurely folded in his lap. He was not supposed to even be in Spain, but in Egypt.” Macintyre, who has perfect pitch when it comes to matters of British eccentricity, reassures us, “It did his career no long-term damage.”

The genius of that parody is the final line, because spymasters have always prided themselves on knowing where they are on the “I-know-they-know-I-know-they-know” regress. Just before the Allied invasion of Sicily, a British officer, Colonel Knox, left a classified cable concerning the invasion plans on the terrace of Shepheard’s Hotel, in Cairo—and no one could find it for two days.

What if Hitler had Won WWII?

Image via Wikipedia
Image via Wikipedia

A great article that I found which pointed me to some great books, including Fatherland by Robert Harris, which I’ve already read. That was the title of the book I was looking for.

There are a bunch of Hitlerian allohistories that I find intriguing. I haven’t yet read The Man in the High Castle by Philip K. Dick.